Podium
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19. New frontiers for healthcare leadership

This topic relates directly to the conference theme. It is based on an international research study involving 32 authors from 17 countries that was published in JAMA Network Open in July 2021 and presents a novel framework of key imperatives for health leaders during the Recovery Stage of a crisis. The three presenters are co-authors of the publication. The will also be informed by two years of researching perspectives of healthcare CEOs across the country and the experience of two senior leader co-presenters.

 

The learning objectives of the workshop are to:

 

•    consolidate which key leadership lessons from the pandemic should be prioritized for embedding widely

•    discuss the kind of leadership that is needed to lead health organizations in the evolving pandemic context

•    consider implications for individual leaders and for talent management (recruiting, promotions, performance assessments, and leadership development) 

 

The activities, methods, and innovations

Using interactive virtual technologies, such as polls, word clouds, and chat functions, we will present the framework briefly and engage participants in discussion of leadership lessons from the pandemic thus far and corresponding opportunities that are available to Canadian health organizations. 

 

In guided discussion in breakout rooms, participants will propose ideas regarding the implications for talent management and leadership development.

 

Before the question period, the final segment will involve discussing next steps and action items.

 

The outcomes and results will be that participants leave with:

 

•    a familiarity with the pandemic leadership framework and how it can be applied in practice

•    a clear sense of the kind of leadership needed to potentially expand the frontiers of healthcare in Canada

•    an understanding of implications for individual leaders and for talent management, including leadership development, in organizations

•    consideration of action next steps for themselves and for their own organizations.

 

Conclusion

Distributed leadership, along with hybrid leadership and care, partnerships and coalitions, and an innovative and strategic foresight mindset are needed for health systems to survive and thrive in the evolving pandemic context and beyond. 

 

Leadership lessons learned

 

•    Distributed leadership is essential, including trusting leaders at all levels to make decisions in alignment with organizational strategy and values

•    Innovation and continuous improvement should be routine expectations embedded in the culture, not something reserved for designated staff or times

•    Partnering across departments, organizations, and sectors can lead to improved health and healthcare quality across the continuum

•    Actively debriefing pandemic lessons and preparing for future crisis can enable organizations to become more adaptable and effective.

 

System change(s)

The pandemic has exposed weaknesses, inefficiencies, and inequities in our health systems leadership and care, along with tremendous opportunities and new models of leadership and care provision to emerge. The health HR crisis has also demonstrated that continuing business as usual or reverting to the way things were before is not sustainable; system transformation is vital. This transformation depends unquestionably on effective leadership, particularly distributed leadership across levels, organizations, and sectors. Hybrid leadership and care, partnerships and coalitions, and an innovative and strategic foresight mindset are needed for health systems to survive and thrive in the evolving pandemic context and beyond.

 

Facilitators:

Dr. Jaason Geerts - Director of Research and Leadership Development, The Canadian College of Health Leaders

Dr. Vicky Stergiopoulos - Physician-in-Chief, the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)

Caroline Lidstone-Jones - Chief Executive Officer, Indigenous Primary Health Care Council